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Premier League clubs vote against use of 5 substitutes next season

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Premier League clubs have voted against allowing the use of five substitutes in matches next season.

Clubs were allowed to increase the number of substitutes from three per match in the 2019-20 campaign when the league restarted in June, after a three-month hiatus due to the coronavirus pandemic.

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Teams will revert to three substitutes in the 2020-21 campaign after a vote on Thursday.

Football's lawmakers, the International Football Association Board (IFAB), changed the rules governing the maximum number of substitutes in May, looking to help teams battling possible fixture congestion as they tried to complete the season in a short period of time.

The IFAB said in July that teams could continue to use up to five substitutes next season, but left it up to individual federations and leagues to decide if they wanted to adopt the rule.

The ruling from IFAB was part of five key areas reviewed by the decision-making body.

Other areas included goalkeeper and player encroachment on penalty kicks.

The body ruled that if a goalkeeper saves a penalty and his foot is over the line then VAR will advise it is retaken. If the keeper is off his line and the ball hits the post or goes over, it won't be retaken unless the goalkeeper has a "material impact" on the kick being missed.

This rule was implemented during the 2019 Women's World Cup and caused several controversial moments including France's Wendie Renard's last minute winner against Nigeria.

Renard missed the original penalty kick but was awarded another one after VAR adjudicated that Chiamaka Nnadozie had moved off her line early.

IFAB moved to change the rules during the tournament after a number of players were booked for encroaching offences.

Information from Reuters contributed to this report.